Publications

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Publications2017-11-16T04:35:33+00:00

News & Media Releases

Current or topical items related to our ongoing campaigns.

  • Tasman Island, Tasman National Park. Photo: Nick Sawyer

More new tourism operations in parks

Three more new tourism operations in parks on Tasmania's east coast have been approved without any public scrutiny via the secretive Expressions of Interest process.

  • The Hazards, Freycinet National Park. Photo: Grant Dixon

Draft Freycinet Master Plan 2018

Planning should start with consideration of the experience to be provided for visitors and the options available to achieve this. Serious consideration must be given to options beyond simply upgrading infrastructure to cope with ever increasing visitor numbers.

  • Lake Malbena, Walls of Jerusalem National Park. Photo: Lyndsey Evans

Proposed tourist development at Lake Malbena

With the referral of this development proposal to the Federal Minister for consideration under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act, the full scale of this proposed development has been revealed.

Tasmanian state election update

Wondering where the major political parties stand when it comes to protecting Tasmania's national parks ahead of the 2018 state election? Read our latest assessment.

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Our Newsletter

Our newsletter is published twice a year. It aims to provide informative articles on issues related to national parks and other reserves, as well as updates on our activities and campaigns. Below are links to recent issues.

  • Remote beach, South Coast, Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. Photo: Nick Sawyer

Newsletter No 26 – Autumn 2018

A theme that occurs in most of the articles in this issue of TNPA News is the pressure to ‘open up’ wild and undisturbed parts of Tasmania for so-called ecotourism developments.

  • Organ Pipes at sunrise, Mt Wellington. Photo: Michael Roberts

Newsletter No 25 – Spring 2017

A theme common to a number of articles in this issue of TNPA News is that Tasmania is being ‘loved to death’. But maybe ‘love’ is not the appropriate word, ‘visited to death’ would be more apt, for ‘love’ implies care.

  • South Cape Bay, Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. Photo: Michael Roberts

Newsletter No 24 – Summer 2017

The theme of most articles in this edition of our newsletter is again the lack of adequate long-term planning and/or resources to facilitate this.

Reports & Submissions

We make formal and informal representations on a range of issues concerning national park and reserve management and also prepare periodic reports on related subjects. Below are links to some recent reports and submissions.

  • Walking track sign, Cockle Creek. Photo: Nick Sawyer

Cockle Creek Precinct draft site plan

The TNPA would be unlikely to support further expansion of visitor facilities into currently undisturbed areas; i.e. if visitor numbers continue to increase, an alternative approach is likely to be needed.

  • Dove Lake carpark from Marions Lookout, Cradle Mountain. Photo: Nick Sawyer

Dove Lake Viewing Shelter draft Development Proposal & EIS

No clear rationale for the proposed viewing shelter has been presented and it comprises one relatively minor component of the Cradle Mountain Master Plan without there having been any opportunity to express an opinion on the merits or otherwise of the overarching plan.

Refining the Definition of Wilderness

Offering a scholarly perspective on the definition of wilderness, this publication appraises the effectiveness of existing definitions and recommends a definition that focuses on experiential as well as ecological values.

  • The Hazards, Freycinet National Park. Photo: Grant Dixon

Draft Freycinet Master Plan 2018

Planning should start with consideration of the experience to be provided for visitors and the options available to achieve this. Serious consideration must be given to options beyond simply upgrading infrastructure to cope with ever increasing visitor numbers.

The Tasmanian National Parks Association offers an independent voice for Tasmania’s national parks and reserves, to ensure they are managed for the conservation of the values for which they were proclaimed.