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Donate2019-05-12T03:55:02+00:00

Your donation is important

Your financial contribution helps us monitor and advocate for the environmental and conservation values of Tasmania’s national parks.

Donations over $2 are fully tax deductible.

To make it easy for you to donate we’ve created a safe and secure Give Now account, which makes it easy for people to donate to their favourite causes.

The Central Highland Council’s refusal to grant a permit for the proposed helicopter-accessed tourist accommodation at Lake Malbena did not put an end to this inappropriate development. The proponent is now appealing this decision.

The Tasmanian National Parks Association (TNPA), The Wilderness Society Tasmania (TWS) and some individuals with a longstanding association with Lake Malbena have joined as parties to the appeal. We have taken this significant step because we strongly believe that Council’s decision to refuse a permit to this development should be upheld. See here and here for more information.

In order to put our best case to the Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal, we have engaged the Environment Defenders Office Tasmania (EDO) to represent us. We will also need to call a variety of experts to prepare detailed reports and give evidence and brief specialist barristers. Despite the EDO’s support, legal and expert fees are likely to run into tens of thousands of dollars.

Your donation will help us to meet these costs and to protect Tasmania’s National Parks.

Our fundraising target is $50,000. So far we have raised $13,690. Please give generously.

Donate to our Tasmanian Parks Guardian and Monitoring Program using the secure online platform Give Now.

You can also donate electronically by direct transfer to :

BSB: 807 009
Account Number: 5135 7585
Name of account: TNPA Public Fund

Please note that the account for donation is different from the account for membership.

Please contact us at treasurer@tnpa.org.au with your contact information and the date you made the transfer to alert us to your donation and so our Treasurer can correctly identify it and send a receipt to you.

Lake Malbena, Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. Photo: Grant Dixon

Thanks for Supporting Our Work

  • The Pelion Plains in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. Part of the iconic Overland Track. Photo: Grant Dixon

Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area

The Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area encompasses 1.6 million hectares of Tasmanian’s southwest and central highlands. Its World Heritage status implies the highest possible level of protection but pro-development governments mean threats to the area’s integrity and wild character persist.

  • Painted Cliffs, Maria Island National Park. Photo: Grant Dixon

National Parks Management

Poor planning and inappropriate development in Tasmania’s national parks and reserves is not restricted to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

  • Waterfall Valley, Cradle Mountain - Lk S Clair National Park. Photo: Gaant Dixon

Tourism & Park Planning

The Tasmanian Government's policy of 'unlocking our national parks' with minimal opportunity for public scrutiny of proposed developments is a a major threat to the integrity of our parks and reserves.

  • Bushwalker above Lake Judd, Southwest National Park. Photo: Grant Dixon.

Recreation Management

Tasmania is one on the most highly regarded bushwalking areas in Australia and there is a long history of attempts to achieve the sustainable management of walking tracks and their use by walkers.

  • Western Arthur Range in the Southwest National Park. Photo: Geoff Dixon

Wilderness

The protection of wild character and managing the opportunity for visitors to experience wilderness underpins a great deal of our work.

The Tasmanian National Parks Association offers an independent voice for Tasmania’s national parks and reserves, to ensure they are managed for the conservation of the values for which they were proclaimed.

Our Approach

We reinforce public values, concerns and criticisms to policy makers and managers, while promoting conservation awareness.

Our Work

A major current concern is the threat to the integrity of parks and reserves from inappropriate tourism developments.